Rebecca's Youth Part 2

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What Book Got Rebecca Hooked?

Rebecca Romijn: Bridge to Terebithia is about two kids, a boy and a girl who become the best of friends. Out of their powerful friendship, and even more powerful imagination, Terebithia is formed. It is a fantasy world that is so exciting, they almost forget the real world exists.

Forget the movie — there's nothing that could possibly be better than this book...

FHM March 1999

FHM: Were you ever in trouble as a kid?
Rebecca Romijn: No. I was a goody two shoes - kind of geeky. But when I was in high school I was friends with the kids who played pranks. One year, they brought thousands of crickets and let them loose in the hallway. Another time they kidnapped a pig and let it loose in school. I was the person who would go with them... but never actually did the deed.

FHM: Were you pestered by boys wanting to "date" you?
Rebecca Romijn: I was very insecure. I was tall and skinny, and I was very self-conscious of my body. I was a late starter in the boobs department - I was as flat as a board until I was about 15 - then one summer I was a C-cup. Huge. Now they're getting smaller again, which bums me out.

FHM: Do you ever wish you were ugly?
Rebecca Romijn: Well, I only do myself up for special occasions. On a day to day basis, I'm pretty scruffy. John says I look better without war-paint anyway, and generally I don't wear make-up, don't blow-dry my hair. I'm fairly low maintenance.

FHM: Isn't there some weird story about your dad being a bit of a nudie?
Rebecca Romijn: That's been blown out of proportion! He was not a nudist. You're European - you know how these things are: it's not an issue to run from bathroom to bedroom with nothing on after a shower. But no, he didn't walk around the house naked!

FHM: What is guaranteed to turn you on?
Rebecca Romijn: When my husband kisses my ears. My ears turn me on like nothing else they must be my most erogenous zone. Just having my ears kneaded is like a full body massage.

FHM: Does it work when you give them a tweak yourself?
Rebecca Romijn: Not really, but it still feels good. If I'm on a plane or something, I'll just kind of fondle my ears. If anyone sees me now they'll know it's kind of like masturbation!

FHM: You realise that by marrying John, a famous, good-looking actor, it's another massive blow to all of us doofuses...
Rebecca Romijn: Well, that wasn't intended. I'm sorry! But I don't feel guilty!

FHM: Do you ever let yourself go and get completely out of your brain?
Rebecca Romijn: I've had my share of booze; I can drink it up with the best of them. What I really love is drinking games. There's one that my friend told me about that I want to try: it's called Bag and Shaft, and the way you do it is the man play and the women guess. The man have to show a tiny bit of skin though their fingers... of their crotch. The woman has to guess if it's the bag or if it's the shaft. That's game, and it sounds fairly simple.

FHM: Doesn't appear that there's much in it for the blokes...
Rebecca Romijn: No there's isn't - except that you get a lot of girls inspecting your skin very close up. I'm looking forward to playing that one.

FHM: Your TV debut in Friends saw you playing a slob, whose unkempt apartment scared the bejesus out of Ross. Ever live with anyone that untidy?
Rebecca Romijn: Yeah, me - I was like that! My dad used to take pictures of my bedroom and use them to blackmail me. One time, I stole a chameleon - a live one - from my sister. I hid it in my closet... and forgot about it. I found it in there - this tiny shrivelled thing - a couple of months later. Isn't that horrible?

Original article: FHM 03/1999

Maxim Magazine

Maxim: We understand you were an enthusiastic child nudist. That ture?
Rebecca Romijn: Oh, I just didn't like to wear a lot of clothes when I was a kid. My family was a bunch of Berkeley hippies-except we really didn't have any money. When people ask my mom is she was a hippie, she always says, "I couldn't afford the outfits." So we shopped at Value Village, and she made the granola and baked that weird healthy bread. All very wholesome.
Maxim: At what point did you decide that clothes were a good idea?
Rebecca Romijn: When I started school. I was pretty naked until I was about six or seven.
Maxim: Could I stop and say I love the phrase "pretty naked"? Did the rest of your family have nudist tendencies, too?
Rebecca Romijn: Are you kidding me? Nudism runs rampant in my family.
Maxim: So, what, you would eat dinner nude?
Rebecca Romijn: No, but when my high school dates used to pick me up, Dad would open the front door completely
naked.

Original article: Maxim

People Magazine

Whatever spawned it, Rebecca Romijn's flair for fashion was nurtured on the cheap. "My parents didn't have any money when I was really little," she says, "so we had to shop at Value Village." The product of a Bohemian Berkeley upbringing, Romijn (pronounced Ro-MAIN) showed her free spirit at the age of 5, when she packed her own bags for a family camping trip to a California state park. Recalls her mother, Elizabeth, a teacher who was divorced from Rebecca's Dutch father, Jaap, a custom furniture builder, in 1979: "One night when we were cooking over the campfire, she came out wearing a little crocheted dress, with a bunch of makeup and jewelry on!" When she turned 18, Romijn had enough confidence to hop a plane to Paris and begin a modeling career. Now 24 (in 1997, RRF), she has settled in L.A. with actor-boyfriend John Stamos and is best known for her regular appearances in the Victoria's Secret catalog. These days, Romijn describes her look as "a mix: I still shop at thrift stores -- and at Barneys." But there's one big difference. "Now," she says, "I know who all
the designers are."

Original article: People Online

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